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Make your car, a Kidney Kar! (Tax Deduction, Free Towing)   Donate www.towKars.org

Young Family of Provo, Utah Donates Car to Kidney Kars

In 2003 Yu Young was a bright eyed, sweet tempered and darling high school Junior when she came to the National Kidney Foundation of Utah & Idaho’s Provo office as an intern. For two years, after school, she answered the phone taking Kidney Cars donations, made photocopies and filed. She did everything for everyone in the office. We liked her so much, we hired her as an employee once she started school at BYU.  She worked her way through college on our megar non-profit hourly wage while making a substantive and meaningful addition to the staff. She was so good and helpful on the phone, she was helpful and kind in the office, and when she graduated BYU I thought my heart might stop. We had not only come to rely on her, but more, she was our friend.

Two days ago, while downloading the Kidney Kars donations, I noticed a car donated from the Young familiy in Provo that included a cheeky little note in the ‘donor comments section.’ It was from Yu.  She had helped her mom and dad donate their car online at www.towKars.org  I was so touched.

Yu went on to become one of first Chinese Immersion teachers in the Salt Lake City School District and is now the director of all language immersion programs.

I miss her here and I am so grateful that even though she’s gone on to much bigger things, she would, in some small and very meaningful way, remember us! Thank you Mr. & Mrs. Young for giving us Yu and for donating your car to Kidney Kars of Utah!

Woman gets kidney in a 68-person kidney donation chain

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A Wausau woman is the last link in a 68-person kidney transplant chain of donations that started in Minnesota, spread across the country and ended at the University of Wisconsin in late March.

After living with renal insufficiency for 30 years, 77-year-old Mitzi Neyens’ condition had begun to worsen in the past two years, she told Press-Gazette Media. She was able to take part in the massive organ donation chain after De Pere school teacher Megan O’Leary donated a kidney to a matched recipient in exchange for a matched kidney for Neyens, her long-time family friend.

“I was more anxious to get disqualified and not be able to donate,” O’Leary said about the donation process. “Most people say it seems like it would be hard, but to me it wasn’t, it just kind of felt like the right thing to do. I wasn’t nervous about it at all.”

The chain began in Minnesota with a woman who wanted to donate a kidney to no one in particular. Thus began the process of coordinating 34 kidney exchanges.

“It’s unheard of,” said Karen Miller, the paired kidney exchange coordinator for the University of Wisconsin transplant program. “It’s very, very difficult. So many things can happen during that process: a donor gets sick; a donor backs out; a recipient gets sick; somebody dies.”

The National Kidney Registry, which uses a computer to link organ donation chains, and 26 hospitals nationwide helped coordinate the kidney exchanges involving 68 people.

“It’s always amazing when transplants occur,” Miller said. “Was I surprised? No. As you get into paired kidney exchange I always hope for the very best and want every paired kidney exchange, every match, to proceed. That’s honestly unrealistic, that’s never going to happen.”

More than 2,500 Wisconsin residents are among the estimated 123,000 Americans in need of an organ transplant.

About 2.6 million people are registered donors in Wisconsin, and about 2 million more are eligible, according to advocates.